Some time has passed since the last blog I wrote.mi am sorry about that.  I will keep more in tuned with writing from here on out. Things have been very hectic with school, the Quayle, and I have also taken up cycling over the past few months.

i think I am going to take a vacation from the Quayle next summer, returning to it for the fall. I want to write again. It has been a long time since I have done anything professionally, since my time at Lawrence.com, and that has been a while. The thing that I miss the most is writing about art, the thing I care about most. Sure I have had a blast curating the current exhibition at the museum, but I will only be there for one more calendar year before my contract is up there and I will need to find something new to do. There are a few places I am thinking about putting my résumé into, which I hope having this strong background in Art History, research and curating will help, as well as my own creations I have done and the time I have spent in the art world,

Yet, with that mentioned, I do have some news. I did have the experience to curate the latest exhibition at the Quayle Museum. That was a fantastic experience. I loved the gathering of the work and reviewing it. Making sure it all went together and the research behind each piece I chose, the book that it came from as well as the artist that created each piece. This exhibition I was fortunate enough to create, focuses strictly on the illustrations in the bible, and includes the King David tapestry. The works though are outstanding. It was a shock to see all of the work that I did back in the work room. No one had a clue about what exactly we had. Some of the artist that have been included in this exhibition (and some of it is original works by the artist, other were reprints that were done during the artist life time) are William Blake, Albrecht Dürer, Jost Amman, "Petit" Bernard Solomon, and Gustave Doré just to name a few. It is a shock to find these works, like Blake's 1st edition Book of Job from 1825, that Blake published himself, from his home, in the collection. As well as the Nuremberg Chronicles, which has wood cuts designed by the then VERY young Dürer in the from 1493. How did a tiny, two room museum in a one stoplight city ever get priceless works such as these? Why has the University not used these works to their advantage and publicized them for scholars to come see? It is questions like these that just puzzle my mind. Yes, some local media have picked up the exhibition, like the local Fox News station, thanks to me and a friend that I know who works there, but out side of that, the school has been unresponsive to this amazing exhibition.

in other news, I am starting to look for graduate schools. I am thinking England will be the best choice for me, and I have narrowed my choices down to really three universities there: Leeds, York, and Reading. Each program has its own very special aspect to it that has appealed to me if the field of Art History, and I hope that one will accept me for my studies. I think that is what I will be doing after I am done at Baker, but I will be done in December of 2014, so next December, and those graduate programs do not start up till late August or early September...so I have time I will need to find employment and save up as much money as possible.

For art news, I think that is all that there is at this moment. I will update more as events happen.

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